Society, Religion & Wellbeing

Head of Department: Mr R Toop

Overview

Society, Religion and Wellbeing is a faculty that consists of the following subject areas.  Please use these quick links to see more about each.

The rationale for grouping these subjects into one faculty area is pedagogical.

Pedagogical

  • they are subjects about personal choice and decision making;
  • they are subjects driven by dialogue, discussion, communication and engagement with others;
  • they are subjects that engage with a diversity of perspectives and opinions;
  • much of the subject matter can be addressed from each vantage point: personal, Societal and Spiritual/Moral. 
  • They can each be assessed in terms of critical thinking skills.

The SRW department is a key component in the school’s dedication to ensure the spiritual, moral, social and cultural development.  Understanding of SMSC underpins the very basis on which SRW is taught.

Spiritual development relates to the inner life through which pupils acquire insights into their personal existence. This characterised by reflecting in experience, attitudes and knowledge and valuing them.

Religious Studies at Warlingham School seeks to increase pupils’ awareness and discuss ultimate questions surrounding existence.

Citizenship and Religious Education has a major part to play in promoting spiritual development, but recognises that it is also the responsibility of the whole school.

Each scheme of work contributes to spiritual and moral development; these are supported by reflective assessment tasks.

Pupils’ spiritual development : (SP)

  1. beliefs, religious or otherwise, which inform their perspective on life and their interest in and respect for different people’s feelings and values
  2. sense of enjoyment and fascination in learning about themselves, others and the world around them, including the intangible
  3. use of imagination and creativity in their learning
  4. willingness to reflect on their experiences

Pupils’ moral development as shown by their: (MOR)

  1. ability to recognise the difference between right and wrong and their readiness to apply this understanding in their own lives
  2. understanding of the consequences of their actions
  3. interest in investigating, and offering reasoned views about, moral and ethical issues

Pupils’ social development as shown by their: (SOC)

  1. use of a range of social skills in different contexts, including working and socialising with pupils from different religious, ethnic and socio-economic backgrounds
  2. willingness to participate in a variety of social settings, cooperating well with others and being able to resolve conflicts effectively
  3. interest in, and understanding of, the way communities and societies function at a variety of levels

Pupils’ cultural development as shown by their:  (CUL)

  1. understanding and appreciation of the wide range of cultural influences which have shaped their own heritage
  2. willingness to participate in, and respond to, artistic, sporting and cultural opportunities
  3. interest in exploring, understanding of and respect for cultural diversity and the extent to which they understand, accept, tolerate, respect and celebrate diversity, as shown by their attitudes towards different religious, ethnic and socio-economic groups in the local, national and global communities.
     

Citizenship Education

Citizenship is about helping pupils to become informed and responsible citizens with the knowledge and skills to play an effective role in society. It involves an understanding of the society in which they live in, including it’s diversity, its government, its laws and the principles upon which these are based, as well as that of the global community and of topical issues. Knowledge of Citizenship has to be developed and exercised through enquiry and communication, and participation in the school community. Citizenship is statutory in both Key Stages 3 and 4 and is offered to some students as a GCSE.

Our aims are in line with the national and local guidelines, they also reflect those of the school:

  • To give students the knowledge, skills and understanding to play an effective role in society at local, national and international levels. Help them to become informed, thoughtful and responsible citizens who are aware of their duties and rights
  • To promote students’ spiritual, moral, social and cultural development, making them more self-confident and responsible both in and beyond the classroom
  • To encourage students to play a helpful part in the life of school, the local community and the wider world
  • To teach them about our economy and democratic institutions and values
  • To encourage respect for different national, religions and ethnic identities
  • To develop students’ ability to reflect on issues and take part in discussions

KS3 & KS4 Citizenship Curriculum

In line with national guidance the following citizenship topics are covered throughout KS3 & KS4 through discrete Citizenship lessons throughout the year and through drop-down days.

The electoral system & Political Parties

  • Constitution & Political System
  • Finance, the economy and money
  • Justice, the Legal System and International Law.

At the end of the summer term each year group from years 7-10 takes part in planning and carrying out an active citizenship project, volunteering to give their time in order to promote an issue/make a change.

Drop down days have in the past included democracy day, EU referendum day as well as mock elections in line with the general election and referendum on the EU.

Citizenship GCSE

Students undertaking the Citizenship GCSE will be following the OCR specification

  • Rights, the law and the legal system in England & Wales
    • Rights & responsibilities
    • The law
    • The legal system
  • Democracy & Government
    • Democracy, elections and voting in the UK
    • National, local, regional and devolved government
    • The British constitution
    • The economy, finance & money
    • Citizenship Participation
    • Role of the media and free press
  • The UK and the wider world
    • Identities & diversity in the UK
    • The UK and its relations with the wider world

Students’ summative assessment is in the form of 3 written papers. 

Paper 1 Citizenship in Perspective is a 50 min synoptic paper MCQ exam,

Paper 2 Citizenship in Action is 1 hour 45mins

Paper 3 Our rights, our society, our world is 1 hour.

Citizenship Curriculum enrichment

Year 9 students have taken part in the Citizenship Foundation’s National Magistrates Mock Trial Competition, where they undertook roles of legal professionals to prepare and conduct a trial as a prosecution and defence team up against other schools.

Law and Legal Studies A Level

Law is a living, dynamic subject which is constantly being modified by changes in opinions, circumstances, what is happening in the country and what the government of this country is trying to achieve.

Law is delivered through the Citizenship curriculum and in KS5 discreetly through A Level Law.  Success in this subject is dependent on a disciplined approach to learn about the law as it is currently. More importantly the key skill is to develop the ability to analyse and challenge the existing laws and the legal system.

Law students have visited the Houses of Parliament, The Supreme Court and Lincolns Inn, and have had visits from leading legal professionals. They have also taken part in the national Bar Mock Trial Competition.

Through studying this subject students will develop a range of skills which will help them develop into individuals equipped to deal successfully with the needs of modern society. These skills include: To logically examine problems and come to conclusions based on your knowledge of the law, to argue for and against a particular point of view based on facts rather than emotions, to effectively work as a part of a team, to be able to influence others, to positively challenge others and to work to deadlines.

The course is assessed through examinations and is delivered through a range of techniques including student lead teaching, group presentations, visits to the Law Courts & Houses of Parliament, outside visitors and conferences.

AS Examinations

Unit 1 – LAW01: Law Making and the Legal System (1 ½ hour written paper)

Unit 2 – LAW02: The Concept of Liability (1 ½ hour written paper)

A2 Examinations

Unit 3 – LAW03 Criminal Law (Offences against the Person) (1 ½ hour written paper)

Unit 4 – LAW04 Criminal Offences against the Property and Concepts of Law (2 hour written paper)

Law Curriculum enrichment

Law students have visited the Houses of Parliament, the Old Bailey, Croydon Employment Tribunal also The Supreme Court & Lincolns Inn.  Some law students have also taken part in the National Bar Mock Trial Competition.

Sociology A Level

Board: AQA

Course Entry Requirements: Grade B or above in GCSE English Literature, GCSE History or GCSE Sociology.

Course Overview

Sociology is the study of society, exploring how beliefs and behaviour are shaped by the world around us. It is a rigorous academic subject requiring good language and reasoning skills. It involves using specialist vocabulary with the aim of interrogating how human interaction is organised and how and why humans interact in the way they do. It is a social science and, as such, uses an evidence-based approach requiring the ability to recall data and sociological studies to support  arguments  made. There is a philosophical component as students will need to ask and answer fundamental questions about the nature of human beings as well as about knowledge itself.

The course is based on developing students’ knowledge and understanding of sociological thought, methods of sociological enquiry and major themes which will run throughout the course. These are:

  • Socialisation, culture and identity, and
  • Social differentiation, power and stratification.

Assessment Format

Paper 1 Education with Theory and Methods (written paper) (2hrs) – 33.3% of A Level.  This paper is almost all essay writing with some short answers.

Paper 2: Topics in Sociology (Families and Households andMass Media)  (written paper) – 33.3% of A Level.  This paper is all essay writing.

Paper 3: Crime and Deviance with Theory and Methods (written paper) (2hrs) – 33.3% of A Level. This paper is mainly essay writing with some short answers.

Possible Careers and Higher Education

Students can go on to study a variety of courses at university and enter a range of careers such as the law and criminal justice system, medicine, social work, education, government and the media. Recent research (2013) shows more Sociology graduates in management positions than any other subject.

Employment rates are higher in all industries for social sciences than any other subject.

Further information from: Miss Tindall or Mr R Toop

Sociology GCSE

Unit B671

Sociology Basics

 

 

Written Paper:

1 hour - 60 marks  (25% of qualification)

Question Paper:

6 sections, candidates answer and three sections

+

Unit B672

Socialisation, Culture and

Identity

 

Written Paper:

1 hour 30 minutes - 120 marks (50% of the qualification)                       

Question Paper:

6 sections, candidates answer any three sections

+

Unit B673

Applying Sociological

Research Techniques      

 

Written Paper:

1 hour - 60 marks (25% of the qualification)

Question Paper:

Based on pre-released research material.  Candidates answer all questions

Religious Education

Religious Studies is a statuary part of the Basic Curriculum [ERA2(a)] and has equal status to other National Curriculum subjects [DES Circular 3/89 para 20]. The law states that Religious Studies must be provided for all students at school, including the Sixth Form. Religious Studies is administered through the Locally County Agreed Syllabus.  As an academy, we are not obliged to follow it.  However, we feel that, in the main, the agreed syllabus is the correct starting point for all our curriculum considerations.

We follow the locally agreed ‘Syllabus for Religious Studies in Surrey’.

Aims

Aims are in line with the national and local guidelines, they also reflect those of the school

To promote ‘…the spiritual, moral cultural, mental and physical development of students at the school and of society, and to prepare such students for the opportunities, responsibilities and experiences of adult life. (ERA Clause 1 – studies Act 1988).

  • To enable students to learn about belief systems and human experience, including religious traditions and their own beliefs and values. This incorporates Attainment target 1 from the Surrey Agreed Syllabus.
  • To enable students to think about their own human development in its personal, social, moral and religious dimensions, and in terms of the wider community to which they belong. This incorporates Attainment Target 2 from the Surrey Agreed Syllabus.

Objectives

Our schemes of work have been designed to achieve our aims. They are based on both thematic approach and study units based on specific religions. It allows students to grasp concepts from specific religious viewpoints, whilst allowing them opportunities to express and develop their own ideas and give them an awareness of the spiritual dimensions of life, and reflect the learning objectives at both AT1 and AT2- Learning from and learning about religion. 

Religious Studies GCSE

Our current Year 11 students are studying the Edexcel GCSE Religious Studies course (units 1 and 8) covering the following topics:

Paper 1: Unit 1 (Covered in Year 11)

  • Believing in God
  • Matters of Life and Death
  • Community Cohesion
  • Marriage and the Family

Paper 2: Unit 8 (Covered in Year 10)

  • Rights and Responsibilities
  • Environment and Medical Issues
  • Crime and Punishment
  • Peace and Conflict

Both papers are 1hr 30 minutes long and make up one hundred per cent of the final marks.

Our current Year 10 students are studying the AQA Spec A course.

Course Length: We cover the course across three years from Year 9 to Year 11.

Course Content:

The GCSE course has two papers:

Component 1: The Study of Religions: Beliefs, Teachings and Practices

Component 2: Thematic Studies

Component 1

We cover the beliefs, teachings and practices of both Christianity and Islam across Year 9 and the first term of Year 10.

Component 2

We have opted to study the following four units, all of which are covered across Year 10 and 11:

  •           Theme A: Relationships and the Family
  •           Theme B: Religion and Life
  •           Theme D: Religion, Peace and Conflict
  •           Theme F: Religion, Human Rights and Social Justice

Assessment:  Two exams – 1hr 45 minutes each, both worth equal weighting.

Religion, Philosophy & Ethics A Level

Board: OCR

Course Entry Requirements: Grade B or above in GCSE English plus grade B or above in GCSE Religious Education.

Course Overview

Religion, Philosophy and Ethics is a course for people who want to think about the world and belief rather than just be given answers. You will be encouraged to consider questions about life, the universe and everything and reflect upon the work of some of the greatest thinkers who have ever lived. You will contemplate issues such as the existence of God, the purpose of life, as well ask questions about some of the most important religious texts. You will develop skills directly transferable to any future academic study, learning to construct critical and analytical essays, discuss complex concepts and reflect upon the thinking of others.

The course focuses on the following areas:

Philosophy of Religion: The problem of evil and suffering, and traditional arguments for the existence of God and the nature and influence of religious experience. A study of philosophers of religion – Marx and Freud, influences and developments in modern thought, problem and use of language.

Religion and Ethics: Ethical Theory; business ethics; euthanasia and debates about right and wrong, good and bad; a comparison of Aristotle and Kant on ethics; the problem of ethical language and medical ethics.

Developments in Christian Thought: Beliefs, teachings and ideas about human life; the world and ultimate reality (original sin, pre-destination); the nature of God; the person of Jesus (was he a social revolutionary? Divine? Liberator?); and Christian moral principles.

Assessment Format

Three written papers (1 hr 15 each) – comprised of a choice of two essay questions out of a possible three for each paper.

Possible Careers and Higher Education

Degrees in Philosophy, Theology, Law, Religious Studies, Politics, Sociology, Government and Politics, English, Social Anthropology. Careers in Law, Politics, the Church, Social Work, Civil Service, Anthropology, Journalism.

Further information from: Mr A Hill

Personal, Social, Health and Economic Education (PSHE)

Personal, Social, Health and Economic Education is a non-statutory planned programme of learning opportunities and experiences that will help children and young people grow and develop as individuals and as members of families and of social and economic communities.  Despite being non-statutory, it contains several aspects of education that are compulsory, such as Sex and Relationships education (SRE).  PSHE in Warlingham brings together personal, social and health education, work-related learning, careers, enterprise, and financial capability. We follow the two new non-statutory programmes of study at key stages 3 and 4 offered by the QCDA: personal wellbeing, and economic wellbeing and financial capability.

We aim to equip young people with knowledge, understanding, attitudes and practical skills to live healthy, safe, productive, fulfilled, capable and responsible lives.  We aim to encourage them to be enterprising and support them in making effective transitions, positive learning and career choices and managing their finances effectively.  We also aim to enable young people to reflect on and clarify their values and attitudes, and explore the complex and sometimes conflicting range of values and attitudes they encounter now and in the future. 

In Warlingham we aim to:

  1. Start where children and young people are: find out what they already know, understand, are able to do and are able to say.  For maximum impact we aim to involve them in the planning of our PSHE education programme.
  2. Plan a ‘spiral programme’ which introduces new and more challenging learning, while building on what has gone before, which reflects and meets the personal developmental needs of the children and young people.
  3. Take a positive approach which does not attempt to induce shock or guilt but focuses on what children and young people can do to keep themselves and others healthy and safe and to lead happy and fulfilling lives.
  4. Offer a wide variety of teaching and learning styles within PSHE education, with an emphasis on interactive learning and the teacher as facilitator.
  5. Provide information which is realistic and relevant and which reinforces positive social norms.
  6. Encourage young people to reflect on their learning and the progress they have made, and to transfer what they have learned to say and to do from one school subject to another, and from school to their lives in the wider community.
  7. Link the PSHE education programme to other whole school approaches, to pastoral support, and provide a setting where the responsible choice becomes the easy choice.  Encourage staff, families and the wider community to get involved.
  8. Embed PSHE education within efforts to ensure children and young people have positive relationships with adults, feel valued and where those who are most vulnerable are identified and supported.
  9. Provide opportunities for children and young people to make real decisions about their lives, to take part in activities which simulate adult choices and where they can demonstrate their ability to take responsibility for their decisions.
  10. Provide a safe and supportive learning environment where children and young people can develop the confidence to ask questions, challenge the information they are offered, draw on their own experience, express their views and opinions and put what they have learned into practice in their own lives.

We have a statutory duty to promote children’s and young people’s wellbeing (Wellbeing is defined in the Children Act 2004 as the promotion of physical and mental health; emotional wellbeing; social and economic wellbeing well being; education, training and recreation; recognition of the contribution made by children to society; and protection from harm and neglect.):

Education for economic wellbeing and financial capability

Through this we aim to equip students with the knowledge, skills and attributes to make the most of changing opportunities in learning and work. Through their learning and experiences inside and outside school, students begin to understand the nature of the world of work, the diversity and function of business, and its contribution to national prosperity. They develop as questioning and informed consumers and learn to manage their money and finances effectively.

Personal wellbeing

We aim to help young people embrace change, feel positive about who they are and enjoy healthy, safe, responsible and fulfilled lives. Through active learning opportunities pupils recognise and manage risk, take increasing responsibility for themselves, their choices and behaviours and make positive contributions to their families, schools and communities. As pupils learn to recognise, develop and communicate their qualities, skills and attitudes, they build knowledge, confidence and self-esteem and make the most of their abilities.

WHY TEACH ABOUT MENTAL HEALTH AND EMOTIONAL WELLBEING ISSUES?

Teaching pupils about mental health and emotional wellbeing as part of a developmental PSHE education curriculum can play a vital role in keeping pupils safe.

It is a good opportunity to promote pupils’ wellbeing through the development of 

  • healthy coping strategies
  • an understanding of pupils’ own emotions as well as those of other people.
  • we can use such lessons as a vehicle for providing pupils who do develop difficulties with strategies to keep themselves healthy and safe,
  • supporting pupils to support any of their friends who are facing challenges.

While the specific content of lessons will be determined by the specific needs of the cohort we’re teaching, there should always be an emphasis on enabling pupils of any age to develop the skills, knowledge, understanding, language and confidence to seek help, as needed, for themselves or others. We can help them to understand when this help might be needed, what help is available, and the likely outcome of seeking support. Additionally, talking openly with children and young people about mental health issues is a simple and effective means of breaking down any possible associated stigma.

Teaching about mental health and emotional wellbeing raises significant challenges for teachers, however: we know that schools want to cover these issues and recognise the imperative to do so, but without sufficient background knowledge teachers can find it daunting.

Relationships and Sex Education

We believe

  1. Effective sex and relationship education is essential if young people are to make responsible and well informed decisions about their lives.
  2. The objective of sex and relationship education is to help and support young people through their physical, emotional and moral development. A successful programme, firmly embedded in all aspects of SRW, will help young people learn to respect themselves and others and move with confidence from childhood through adolescence into adulthood.
  3. The SRW curriculum will help pupils develop the skills and understanding they need to live confident, healthy and independent lives.
  4. As part of sex and relationship education, pupils should be taught about the nature and importance of marriage for family life and bringing up children. But the Government recognises – as in the Home Office, Ministerial Group on the Family consultation document “Supporting Families”- that there are strong and mutually supportive relationships outside marriage. Therefore pupils should learn the significance of marriage and stable relationships as key building blocks of community and society.
  5. Care needs to be taken to ensure that there is no stigmatisation of children based on their home circumstances. Pupils need also to be given accurate information and helped to develop skills to enable them to understand difference and respect themselves and others and for the purpose also of preventing and removing prejudice. Secondary pupils should learn to understand human sexuality, learn the reasons for delaying sexual activity and the benefits to be gained from such delay, and learn about obtaining appropriate advice on sexual health.
  6. Sex and relationship education should contribute to promoting the spiritual, moral, cultural, mental and physical development of pupils at school and of society and preparing pupils for the opportunities, responsibilities and experiences of adult life.
  7. Effective sex and relationship education does not encourage early sexual experimentation. It should teach young people to understand human sexuality and to respect themselves and others. It enables young people to mature, to build up their confidence and self-esteem and understand the reasons for delaying sexual activity. It builds up knowledge and skills which are particularly important today because of the many different and conflicting pressures on young people.

What is sex and relationship education?

It is lifelong learning about physical, moral and emotional development. It is about the understanding of the importance of marriage for family life, stable and loving relationships, respect, love and care. It is also about the teaching of sex, sexuality, and sexual health. It is not about the promotion of sexual orientation or sexual activity which would be inappropriate.

It has three main elements:

  1. attitudes and values
    • learning the importance of values and individual conscience and moral considerations;
    • learning the value of family life, marriage, and stable and loving relationships for the nurture of children;
    • learning the value of respect, love and care;
    • exploring, considering and understanding moral dilemmas; and
    • developing critical thinking as part of decision-making.
  2. personal and social skills
    • learning to manage emotions and relationships confidently and sensitively;
    • developing self-respect and empathy for others;
    • learning to make choices based on an understanding of difference and with an absence of prejudice;
    • developing an appreciation of the consequences of choices made;
    • managing conflict; and – learning how to recognise and avoid exploitation and abuse.
  3. knowledge and understanding
  • learning and understanding physical development at appropriate stages;
  • understanding human sexuality, reproduction, sexual health, emotions and relationships;
  • learning about contraception and the range of local and national sexual health advice, contraception and support services;
  • learning the reasons for delaying sexual activity, and the benefits to be gained from such delay; and
  • the avoidance of unplanned pregnancy.

Further information about sex and relationship education is available:

  • locally through the LEA PSHE advisory service and local Health Promotion Units;
  • from a range of national statutory bodies and voluntary organisations such as the Sex Education Forum based at the National Children’s Bureau;
  • on the Healthy Schools Programme website Wired for Health (www.wiredforhealth.gov.uk). Further information about the Social Exclusion Unit’s report on Teenage Pregnancy is available: ● through the Cabinet Office website (www.cabinet-office.gov.uk/seu/index.htm);
  • from the Teenage Pregnancy Unit on 020 7972 4574.