• Computing 1
  • Computing 2
  • Computing 3

Computing

Acting Head of Department: Mr F Holder

Overview

The National Curriculum for Computing aims to ensure that all pupils:

  • Can understand and apply the fundamental principles of computer science, including logic, algorithms, data representation and communication.
  • Can analyse problems in computational terms, and have repeated practical experience of writing computer programs in order to solve such problems.
  • Can evaluate and apply information technology, including new or unfamiliar technologies, analytically to solve problems.
  • Are responsible, competent, confident and creative users of information and communication technology

KS3 Schemes of Work

Problem based tasks enable students to build capability by learning and applying skills in relevant, interesting scenarios:

Managing, manipulating and presenting data;

Game creation programming;

Computer hardware and networking technologies;

Website development;

Multimedia;

App development:

Programming using graphical and text based programming languages

GCSE Computing

 Exam Board: OCR

This three unit course is designed to give an in-depth understanding of how computer technology works and a look at what goes on ‘behind the scenes’. Assessment is based on a written exam, a practical investigation and programming tasks.

Assessment Format

Component

Title

Assessment

% of Qualification

1

Computer Systems (external exam)

Systems architecture

Memory

Storage

Wired and wireless networks

Network topologies, protocols and layers

System security

Systems software

Moral, legal, cultural and environmental concerns

40%

2

Computational Thinking, Algorithnms and Programming (external exam)

Algorithms

Programming techniques

Producing robust programs

Computational logic

Translators and facilities of languages

Data representation

40%

3

Programming Project (Controlled assessment)

Programming techniques

• Analysis

• Design

• Development

• Testing and evaluation and conclusions

20%


The computer systems and computational thinking units will teach the theory about a wide range of issues such as hardware and software, the representation of data in computer systems, databases, computer communications and networking, programming and more.

The programming project will involve the design, coding and testing of a solution to a computing task from a set of options supplied by OCR.

Study Days/Educational Trips
Year 10 GCSE Computing - visit to National Museum of Computing Bletchley Park

Key Stage 5 Overview

Edexcel BTEC Level 3 Extended Certificate (601/7575/8)

Duration: 2 years

Board: Edexcel

Course Entry Qualifications: A minimum of 5 GCSEs grade C or above plus a grade C in GSCE Computing or a pass in Certificate in Digital Applications (CiDA).

Course Description

This qualification is designed for learners who are interested in an introduction to the study of creating IT systems to manage and share information, alongside other fields of study, with a view to progressing to a wide range of higher education courses, not necessarily in IT. The Edexcel BTEC Level 3 Subsidiary Diploma in IT is equivalent to one A level and provides an introduction to the sector for learners who are looking to build a career in Information Technology. It is a 2 year qualification that consists of two mandatory units plus 4 optional units.

The units for the BTEC qualifications:

Mandatory units:

Unit 1 Information Technology Systems (external exam)

Learners study the role of computer systems and the implications of their use in personal and professional situations.

Unit 2: Creating Systems to Manage Information (external practical exam)

The aim of this unit is to enable learners to study the design, creation, testing and evaluation of a relational database system to manage information.

Unit 3: Using Social Media in Business (coursework assessed)

Learners explore how businesses use social media to promote their products and services. Learners also implement social media activities in a business to meet requirements.

Optional units (one to be decided from either):

Unit 5 Data Modelling (coursework assessed)

Learners study how data modelling can be used to solve problems. They will design and implement

a data model to meet client requirements.

Unit 6 Website development (coursework assessed)

Learners investigate website development principles. They will design and develop a website using

scripting languages.

Course Entry Requirements:

Grade B or above in

GCSE Computing or a Merit in Certificate in Digital

Applications (CiDA), Grade B in GCSE Mathematics,

Grade B in GCSE English.

A Level Computer Science

Board: OCR

Course Entry Requirements: Grade B or above in GCSE Computing or a Merit in Certificate in Digital Applications (CiDA), Grade B in GCSE Mathematics, Grade B in GCSE English.

Course Overview

Computer Science is a practical subject where students can apply the academic principles learned in the classroom to real-world systems. It’s an intensely creative subject that combines invention and excitement, that can look at the natural world through a digital prism. The Computer Science qualifications will value computational thinking, helping students to develop the skills to solve problems, design systems and understand the power and limits of human and machine intelligence.

Computing Principles

This component will cover the characteristics of contemporary systems architecture and other areas including the following:

• Operating systems

• Introduction to programming

• Data types, structures and algorithms

• Exchanging data and web technologies

• Using Boolean algebra

• Legal and ethical issues

Algorithms and problem solving

This component will cover a scenario/task contained in the paper, which could be an algorithm or a text page-based task, which will involve problem solving. Other areas covered include the following:

• Elements of computational thinking

• Programming techniques

• Software development methodologies

• Algorithms

• Standard algorithms

Computer systems

This component will cover the characteristics of contemporary systems architecture and other areas including the following:

• Software and its development

• Types of programming languages

• Data types, representation and structures

• Exchanging data and web technologies

• Following algorithms

• Using Boolean algebra

• Legal, moral and ethical issues

Algorithms and programming

This component will be a traditionally marked and structured question paper with two sections, both of which will include a mix of question types: short-answer, longer-answer, type questions.

Section A – Traditional questions concerning computational thinking.

• Elements of computational thinking

• Programming and problem solving

• Pattern recognition, abstraction and decomposition

• Algorithm design and efficiency

• Standard algorithms

Section B – There will be a scenario/task contained in the paper, which could be an algorithm or a text page-based task, which will involve problem solving.

Programming project

Students and/or centres select their own user-driven problem of an appropriate size and complexity to solve. This will enable them to demonstrate the skills and knowledge necessary to meet the assessment objectives. Students will need to analyse the problem, design a solution, implement the solution and give a thorough evaluation.

Assessment Format

Computing principles (Externally-marked question paper) (1hr 15mins) – 25%

Algorithms and problem solving (Externally-marked question paper) (1hr 15mins) – 25%

Computer systems (Externally-marked question paper) (2hrs 30mins) – 20%

Algorithms and programming (Externally-marked question paper) (2hrs 30mins) – 20%

Programming project (Internally-assessed, externally-moderated) – 10%

Possible Careers and Higher Education

This course is an excellent preparation for students who want to go on to study computer science at a higher level and will also provide a good grounding for other subject areas that require computational thinking and analytical skills.